Boston Transit*

 

copyright 2009 - 2012 UpperMidwestCycling

Last updated 25 September, 2012 21:50



 
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Main Rail site
tba
Flood
History
Seashore

 

© upperMidwestCycling 2009 -2012

Last updated: 25 September, 2012 21:50

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e Line - Green Line
e Line
orangel
red line
bluenew
Greem Line Main
C Line

This site is dedicated to the Massachusetts Bay Transit Authority and its predecessor companies. It is focused on the subway system in Boston but also includes pictures of both bus and commuter train service as well. It will include some historical documentation as well as specific events or situations unique to the property. All though one can trace the history as far as the 1830's the MBTA has the oldest subway in the United States that has been in constant service since 1897. Because ot that the present light rail vehicles have to be built to strict specifications to navigate curves in the subway system.

Each subway line is named after a color with cars painted accordingly. The three heavy rail subway lines: Red, Orange and Blue have their own unique equipment and are not physically connected with each other. A more detailed descrption can be found for each of the lines on this website. The MBTA is a comprehensive property that includes not only the subway system but an extensive commuter line called the Purple Line that runs out of two railroad stations not connected with each other and goes as far south as Rhode Island and north to close to New Hampshire. The Purple line is made up of lines that MBTA took over from several commuter carriers.

MBTA is also known by locals as the "T". The "T" has expanded and rebuilt much of its system over the past 15 years due in part to the controversial "Big Dig" project. In many instances the newer lines either follow or have taken over a railroad right of way. That tradition goes back to the 1920's. The latest planned expansion of the Green Line will also follow that pattern. Each line has its own unique history to it.

Because of the original and present layout of Boston and vicinity the usual grid pattern found in other cities does not exist for the most part. In addition, Boston is laid out in clusters as far as transit is concerned. Within those clusters are intermodal facilites where different lines converge. A good example is Harvard Square where both bus and the remaining trackless trolleys converge at Harvard Square where the Red Line has one of its stations. In addition there are a few streets that may appear to go north to south or east to west but in many instances they may run diagonally and change directions making a good navigation system almost a must for visitors or - better yet - riding the "T".

The "T", like any large organization has not been without issues. Covered in this website will be the Boeing Vertol problems, the 1996 Green Line flood and more. But on the whole, when one considers the size of the "T" and the fact that it includes just about every mode of transit including boats it has a safe and efficient system.

This project is based in part on three separate visits to Boston, 2007, 2008 and 2009. In addition there are others who are helping out with this project. It is impossible to do everything and anything but hopefully this site will give those looking at it a better overview of not only the "T" but Boston in general.

If you go to the Charlie page you will have to work hard to "get off the train"! Have fun.

Please bookmark this page.

*This is the new name for this site pending final approval. The site will eventually be transferred over to www.bostontransit.net. At the present time that site is dormant.

This website is a private concern. Its contents are copyrighted and may not be used for commercial purposes. Pictures unless otherwise noted are by the webmaster and remain his intellectual property. Other pictures will be so noted as to the contributer and/or organization. Those willing to submit picutres may do so by notifying the webmaster by clicking on links found on most pages. A prompt response will normally be given with needs and requirements. Full credit will be given.

Below you will find the present links to our pages. The website is dynamic meaning there will always be changes. It is suggested you bookmark only this page.